Bjørn Nyland Visits Samsungs EVAR Autonomous Charging Robot Video

Automatic Rapid Charging Robot Becomes Reality, But Not From Tesla EVAR is an autonomous charging robot for parking lotsBjørn Nyland seems to find the gold mine of interesting EV stuff in South Korea, presenting another slick development.The latest episode is about the Electric Vehicle Automatic Recharging (EVAR) robot, at the Samsung C-Lab Project.EVAR can autonomously find and approach an electric car that needs a recharge (the need must first be signalized through the app). When EVAR  finds the car and connects to the special EVSE adapter attached to the registration plate, it offers 7.4 kW of single-phase charging from a 10 kWh battery. The proof-of-concept spec, of course, could be different in the future with higher power and a bigger battery.More charging robots Source: Electric Vehicle News Volkswagen Turns To Kuka For Robots For Autonomous Electric Cars Tesla’s Robotic “Let’s Get It On” Charger – Video Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 12, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Does the market need such robots? We are not encouraged at this time as the cost of installation of dozens or hundreds of outlets that share power (which is important) would probably be more cost effective, but who knows.EVAR team released today also official video:“Automatic charging robot with high capacity battery for EV cars, which drives autonomously within the parking lot”.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } read more

Electrek Podcast Elon Musks Boring Company Teslas delivery effort Donald Trump goes

first_imgSource: Charge Forward This week on the Electrek Podcast, we discuss the most popular news in the world of sustainable transport and energy, including Elon Musk’s Boring Company launches its first tunnel, Tesla launches new end-of-the-year delivery initiatives, Donald Trump goes after EVs, and more. more…The post Electrek Podcast: Elon Musk’s Boring Company, Tesla’s delivery effort, Donald Trump goes after EVs, and more appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Existing Tesla Superchargers are now cranking out more power

first_imgAs charging technology improves, power levels are going up, and charging times are coming down. As usual, Tesla is at the forefront of this trend (for now). The company recently launched the next-generation Supercharger V3, which is capable of charging at rates up to 250 kW.Tesla also announced plans to increase the power levels at existing Supercharger V2 stations. The company says it will update its V2 infrastructure to enable a new peak charging rate of 145 kW. As Electrek reports, the stations were already theoretically able to deliver 145 kW, but it was believed that the vehicles’ software limited charging to a lower rate.Model 3 is capable of charging at up to 250 kW, and Tesla has begun pushing out a software update (2019.7.11) that will enable Model 3s to get the maximum rate out of V2 chargers.A Reddit user known as u/privaterbok reported achieving a 147 kW charging rate at a V2 Supercharger with his or her Long Range RWD Model 3, and posted pix to prove it. Electrek calculates that the peak rate works out to 627 miles per hour.Models S and X should also be able to take advantage of the higher charging rates, but their new peak rate is as yet unknown.Tesla may not hold the fast charging crown for long – Electrify America has already opened stations offering 350 kW charging, and the upcoming Audi e-tron and Porsche Taycan are supposed to be able to handle the power. Source: Electrek Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

Benítez looks for a lift after Liverpools worst moment

first_imgBenítez looks for a lift after Liverpool’s worst moment Share on Facebook Soccer This article is more than 11 years old Andy Hunter Share via Email Share on Twitter Share on Pinterest Share on Twitter Share via Email Rafael Benítez, undermined by his employers and with his team underachieving on the pitch, conceded yesterday that he is enduring his most difficult period as Liverpool manager, as Dubai International Capital prepared to renew its bid to buy the club from George Gillett and Tom Hicks.One week after the refinancing deal that seemed to have secured the Americans’ Anfield tenure, Gillett has still to endorse his business partner’s plans for the club or state, as Hicks has done, that his 50% stake in Liverpool is not for sale. Their ownership of the club will attract fresh protest from supporters at this evening’s home game against Sunderland and the apparently fractured relationship has bolstered DIC’s confidence that it can finally take control. The investment arm of the Dubai government has spent the past week studying the £350m refinancing loan and it is believed a formal offer to Gillett and Hicks may be submitted in the next seven days. Hicks, however, will not even consider walking away without a substantial profit on the table.It is against this continued instability that Liverpool will, against Sunderland, seek their first league win since Boxing Day, with their manager admitting the stoppage-time penalty defeat at West Ham on Wednesday had left him with “the worst feeling” of an already arduous campaign. Liverpool languish seventh in the Premier League, on points as close to Roy Keane’s strugglers as they are to Manchester United and Arsenal, and Benítez admits failure to meet pre-season expectations of a title challenge has taken its toll.”The expectations were different this year but everything has been more difficult,” he said. “It is clear the situation is different to when I arrived. In the first season I wanted to give the people something in the Premier League and it was very disappointing to finish fifth, but we won the Champions League. In the second we won the FA Cup and last season we reached the Champions League final again. This has been difficult because the expectations were different but I have to stay positive and I think we can change things by winning games. It is time for all of us, the players and the staff, to give the supporters what they deserve.”Benítez remains adamant that off-field problems will not make him reconsider his position and insists he can win the club’s elusive 19th title. “If I thought it was impossible then maybe I could look at other options but I’m not thinking about that. I think we can win titles and win the Premier League – not this year but in the future. Liverpool is a town of fighters and I will fight. I will try to do my best in every game and during the rest of my time here, which may be 10 years.”Stephen Hunt, targeted by Sunderland last month, has signed a contract extension at Reading to 2011. Soccer This article is more than 11 years old Rafael Benítez Fri 1 Feb 2008 22.51 EST Share on Facebook news Share on Messenger Topics Reuse this content Share on WhatsApp Share on LinkedIn Shares00 First published on Fri 1 Feb 2008 22.51 EST Liverpoollast_img read more

Strettle joins an England squad still working to avoid penalties

first_imgShare on LinkedIn This article is more than 10 years old Strettle joins an England squad still working to avoid penalties Six Nations Share on Facebook Support The Guardian Since you’re here… France rugby union team Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Mon 9 Mar 2009 20.05 EDT This article is more than 10 years old England wing David Strettle has had a turbulent couple of years. Photograph: Phil Walter/Getty Images England have taken the precaution of ­adding the Harlequins wing David ­Strettle to their Six Nations squad as cover for Paul Sackey, who remains a slight doubt for next Sunday’s home game against France. Ugo Monye and Mathew Tait already offer alternative options if Sackey fails a fitness test on a sore calf but Strettle still has every reason to be grateful after a turbulent 21 months.The 25-year-old from Cheshire has ­broken down three times with a recurring foot problem which forced him out of the 2007 World Cup and has so far limited him to 13 minutes in the past two Six Nations. He also suffered serious food poisoning on tour in South Africa in 2007 and acute embarrassment last ­summer when he became the subject of kiss-and-tell allegations in New Zealand. He was subsequently left out of the senior EPS squad and only returned to the Quins’ first team following his most recent metatarsal injury at the end of January.England are not due to announce their starting line-up until tomorrow but are expected to confirm a 22-man squad later today for a game of considerable significance. While Leicester’s Louis Deacon has also been summoned as squad cover and the Bath-bound prop David Wilson invited along to bolster the front-row roster in training, the focus remains on the squad’s collective ability to stem the damaging flow of sin-binnings that has undermined their development under Martin Johnson.The issue, inevitably, was top of the agenda at the squad’s three-day get-together near Leeds last week when even the number of shuttle runs was ­specifically chosen to highlight the team’s unacceptable penalty count. “We related the number of repetitions to how many penalties were given away in the last game,” confirmed John Wells, the forwards coach. Given England conceded 18 penalties and free-kicks, it is a minor miracle they finished before nightfall. On closer analysis, however, England remain adamant that only “four or five” of the penalties conceded in Dublin were unacceptable. The majority were in the so-called “grey area” around the breakdown and Wells believes the problem can be fixed against the French to the ­satisfaction of the Australian referee Stuart Dickinson, who, as the video official, ruled out Mark Cueto’s ‘try’ during the 2007 World Cup final. It is England’s belief that Dickinson will seek to adhere to the latest trend and favour the team which shows the most attacking intent.They are also drawing consolation from the fact they have yet to concede a try in the current championship when they have had 15 men on the field. “A win would help the atmosphere, but there’s no doubt that as a group of players we’ve progressed,” insisted Wells. “That hasn’t shown in terms of results which is frustrating, but I think we’re going in the right direction. We might soon be doing enough in other areas to ensure that penalties do not have a massive bearing on the end result.”The coaching staff also brushed aside claims by the former England centre Will Greenwood that Wasps’ Danny Cipriani is not being picked because he is unpopular with some of his team-mates. “I’ve played with and against plenty of players I don’t like but it’s certainly never crept into ­selection,” insisted Graham Rowntree, England’s scrummaging coach. Rugby union England rugby union team Share via Emailcenter_img Six Nations 2009 Share on Pinterest … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Twitter Robert Kitson Shares00 news Reuse this content Six Nations Topics Share via Email • Overdue piece of good news for Harlequins wing• England to name team on Wednesday Share on WhatsApp First published on Mon 9 Mar 2009 20.05 EDT Share on Messengerlast_img read more

Prosecutorial Misconduct Mishaps In FCPA Cases

first_imgProsecutorial misconduct has received much attention lately.Recognizing that the term itself is not crystal clear, this post highlights several instances of prosecutorial misconduct, or at the very least prosecutorial mishaps, in FCPA contested proceedings.While the examples highlighted below may not seem numerous, keep in mind that DOJ corporate FCPA enforcement actions rarely result in related criminal charges against individuals. In other words, it is not often that the described dynamic even has a chance of playing out.Before turning to FCPA specifics, some recent writings regarding prosecutorial misconduct.From a recent New York Times editorial “To Stop Bad Prosecutors, Call the Feds”“Prosecutors are the most powerful players in the American criminal justice system. Their decisions — like whom to charge with a crime, and what sentence to seek — have profound consequences.So why is it so hard to keep them from breaking the law or violating the Constitution?The short answer is that they are almost never held accountable for misconduct, even when it results in wrongful convictions. It is time for a new approach to ending this behavior: federal oversight of prosecutors’ offices that repeatedly ignore defendants’ legal and constitutional rights.”From a recent Wall Street Journal editorial “Bringing Justice to Justice”“Maybe [Justice] needs a new Yates memo that focuses on the consequences for DOJ lawyers who bring cases that never should be brought – with sanctions for legal abuses.”From another recent Wall Street Journal editorial “Reining in Prosecutorial Misconduct”“The parade of prosecutorial-misconduct cases marches on, to a drumbeat of public outrage and accusation about justice denied.”For an engaging read on prosecutorial misconduct issues, see a recent article from Professors Bruce Green and Ellen Yaaroshefsky titled “Prosecutorial Accountability 2.0.”Reading the article raised the following issues in my mind.Why do prosecutors tend to get the benefit of the doubt when prosecutorial misconduct issues arises, but criminal defendants often do not?When prosecutors engage in misconduct, why does the root cause analysis often tend to focus on the individual and whether the individual was a “rogue” prosecutor instead of prosecutor office culture “that values winning cases or convicting criminal over playing by the rules.” As stated in the article, does such a focus “ignore an examination of office culture that may promote aggressive interpretation of an indifference to ethical obligations.”As highlighted below, there have been several instances of prosecutorial misconduct, or at the very least prosecutorial mishaps, in FCPA contested proceedings.Lindsey Manufacturing / Keith Lindsey / Steven LeeThe most egregious instance was the DOJ’s failed prosecution of Lindsey Manufacturing and its executives Keith Lindsey and Steven Lee.By way of background, in May 2011 the defendants were convicted after a five week trial by a federal jury in the Central District of California of one count of conspiracy to violate the FCPA and five counts of FCPA violations.  Reacting to the guilty verdicts, Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer stated: “Today’s guilty verdicts are an important milestone in our Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) enforcement efforts. Lindsey Manufacturing is the first company to be tried and convicted on FCPA violations, but it will not be the last.”As detailed in this prior post, in December 2011, the DOJ’s “important milestone” was erased when Judge Howard Matz, after months of legal wrangling, vacated the convictions and dismissed the indictment.   See here for Judge Matz’s ruling.  In his ruling, Judge Matz summed up the government’s conduct as an “unusual and extreme picture of a prosecution gone badly awry.”In pertinent part, Judge Matz stated:“In this Court’s experience, almost all of the prosecutors in the Office of the United States Attorney for this district consistently display admirable professionalism, integrity and fairness.  [A footnote states – Two of the three members of the prosecution team in this case were from the Washington, D.C., main office of the Department of Justice, including the lawyer who initiated the investigation. Only one “local” AUSA was involved].  So it is with deep regret that this Court is compelled to find that the Government team allowed a key FBI agent to testify untruthfully before the grand jury, inserted material falsehoods into affidavits submitted to magistrate judges in support of applications for search warrants and seizure warrants, improperly reviewed e-mail communications between one Defendant and her lawyer, recklessly failed to comply with its discovery obligations, posed questions to certain witnesses in violation of the Court’s rulings, engaged in questionable behavior during closing argument and even made misrepresentations to the Court.  Consequently, the Court throws out the convictions of Defendants Lindsey Manufacturing Company, Keith E. Lindsey and Steve K. Lee and dismisses the First Superseding Indictment.”In reaching his conclusion, Judge Matz  acknowledged that even he was overwhelmed by the pace of the case and thus unable to see sooner the gravity of the DOJ’s misconduct.  The following paragraph from his order was telling.“… [When a trial judge managing a large docket is required to devote a great deal of time and effort to a fast-moving case that requires numerous rulings, often the judge will miss the proverbial forest for the trees. That is what occurred here.  This Court was confronted with so many motions challenging the Government’s conduct that it was difficult to step back and look into whether what was going on reflected not isolated acts but a pattern of invidious conduct. Although the Court did issue orders granting various of Defendants’ motions to suppress, motions to exclude evidence, motions to compel further discovery, motions for curative instructions, etc., it did not fully comprehend how the various pieces fit together. And fit together they do. The Government has acknowledged making many “mistakes,” as it characterizes them. “Many” indeed. So many in fact, and so varied, and occurring over so lengthy a period (between 2008 and 2011) that they add up to an unusual and extreme picture of a prosecution gone badly awry. To paraphrase what former Senator Everett Dirksen supposedly said, “a few mistakes here and a few mistakes there and pretty soon you’re talking misconduct.””Africa Sting CasesWhile perhaps not as egregious as the above instance, Judge Richard Leon also had harsh words for the DOJ in connection with the DOJ’s failed manufactured Africa Sting.  As highlighted in this post, when dismissing all remaining charges against the defendants (certain defendants were found not guilty), Judge Leon stated in pertinent part:“This appears to be the end of a long and sad chapter in the annals of white collar criminal enforcement.[…]Two years ago, at the very outset of this case I expressed more than my fair share of concerns on the record regarding the way this case has been charged and was being prosecuted.  Later, during the two trials that I presided over I specifically commented again on the record regarding the government’s very, very aggressive conspiracy theory that was pushing its already generous elasticity to its outer limits.  Of course, in the second trial that elastic snapped in the absence of the necessary evidence to sustain it.In addition, in that same trial, I expressed on a number of occasions my concerns regarding the way this case had been investigated and was conducted especially vis-a-vis the handling of Mr. Bistrong.  I even had an occasion, sadly, to chastise the government in a situation where the government’s handling of the discovery process constituted sharp practices that have no place in a federal courtroom.”In a rare move, the jury foreperson in one of the failed Africa Sting trials went public. As noted in this post, the jury foreperson stated:“As noted above, a number of jurors were troubled by the nature of the FBI sting operation. Specifically, some seemed unwilling to convict on the basis of vague language (e.g., “commission” instead of “bribe”) and where the defendants had not sought out the deal. These jurors were largely not participatory in the deliberations and when specifically called upon for their views would typically voice agreement with views expressed by some other juror voting “Not Guilty.” But enough small comments through the course of deliberations lead me to believe that their underlying view was that the defendants had acted in good faith and the FBI/DOJ in bad faith. Along the same lines, more than one juror voiced concern that it would be unjust for the defendants in this case to be convicted when the government relied so heavily on Mr. Bistrong who freely admitted on the stand more illegal acts than the entire group of defendants was accused of, yet was able to plead to only one count of conspiracy to violate the FCPA.”Joseph SigelmanAs highlighted here, in June 2015 the DOJ’s most recent FCPA criminal trial came to an abrupt halt early in the trial after the DOJ’s star witness admitted to giving false testimony on the stand. Indeed, Judge Joseph Irenas (D.N.J.) asked the witness “did you have a hallucination?” Shortly after this mishap, Sigelman did plead guilty to a substantial reduced charge and as highlighted in this post, in sentencing Sigelman to no jail time Judge Irenas blasted the DOJ.John O’SheaIn 2009, the DOJ charged John O’Shea with various FCPA and related offenses. O’Shea proceeded to trial, and in January 2012, following DOJ’s case, Judge Lynn Hughes (S.D. Texas) dismissed the FCPA charges against O’Shea. In doing so, Hughes stated, ‘‘The problem here is that the principal witness against Mr. O’Shea . . . knows almost nothing.’’In addition, during the trial, Judge Hughes criticized the DOJ as follows: “the Government should have been prepared before they brought the charges to the Grand Jury. It’s something you have to prove. And you shouldn’t indict people on stuff you can’t prove.”Harris Corporation / John Iacobucci / Ronald SchultzIn 1990, the DOJ criminally charged Harris Corporation (a company that manufactured telephone switching systems) and two executives John Iacobucci and Ronald Schultz with conspiracy to violate the FCPA. According to the charging documents, the defendants paid and authorized the payment of money to a third-party “while knowing that a portion of such money” would be offered or given, directly or indirectly, to officials of the Government of Colombia in order to influence the officials to award government telecommunications contracts to Harris. According to the indictment, pursuant to the conspiracy Harris retained an agent based upon representations that he had connections with officials in the government that he would use to assist Harris in obtaining telecommunications contracts.Upon filing of the criminal charges, the Chairman and CEO of Harris stated:“We believe that these charges are based upon a distorted view of the facts, and they represent a radical departure from existing enforcement policies. We have cooperated fully with the DOJ in its investigation of the allegations, providing clear evidence refuting the charges.”The company, along with the individuals, put the DOJ to its burden of proof at trial.  In 1991, the trial court judge granted a motion for judgment of acquittal.  Media reports stated: “Shortly after the government rested its case, [the trial court judge] ruled from the bench that ‘no reasonable jury’ could convict the company nor its executives on any of the five bribery-related counts for which they were indicted. Citing insufficient evidence, [the judge] said the government had failed to show any intent by the defendants to enter into a criminal conspiracy. [The judge] also said it was the first time in his six years on the federal bench that he had dismissed a criminal case at mid-trial for lack of evidence.”After the judgment of acquittal, the Chairman and CEO of Harris stated:“We’re very pleased that [we] have been vindicated, but we believe the charges should never have been brought in the first place. The DOJ’s case was based upon a distorted view of the facts and represented a radical departure from existing enforcement policies. As a result, American taxpayers have been burdened with unnecessary litigation costs, and Harris has incurred more than $3 million in legal fees, spent many hundreds of hours of our people’s time, and suffered a substantial disruption of the corporation’s business to prove an absence of wrongdoing that should have been apparent from the beginning. The case has also placed a heavy strain on our two employees named in the indictment.”last_img read more

My experience with MAGIC

first_imgby, John MilliganTweetShare12ShareEmail12 SharesI signed up for the M.A.G.I.C. Project two-day immersion course at the University of Southern Indiana (USI) not really knowing what to expect. This feeling only intensified once I walked into the class; there were people of all different ages, ethnicities, and walks of life milling around the room. We were greeted by the M.A.G.I.C. instructors (M.A.G.I.C. stands for Multi-Ability, multi-Generational, Inclusive Community) and were told to be prepared for a lot of moving around and interactive activities. I immediately felt apprehensive before class started. I am not much of an extrovert and sometimes feel anxious about conversing with people who are perfect strangers, but I was already here so I might as well find out what this class is all about. We began our journey through this class with quick introductions and meet-and-greets with others around the room and then it took off from there.The instructors invited us to participate in a series of Liberating Structures activities that allowed us to reflect on our lives and experiences. We used a bevy of art materials and visual aids in order to illustrate our barriers and privileges that have contributed to the quality of our lives thus far. Nobody sits around and thinks to himself or herself: “What qualities make my life easier than others?”However, in doing so, it allowed me to put my struggles and difficulties into perspective. I may struggle with issues as everyone does, but there are a lot of people that struggle with far more. We were allocated plenty of time in order to deeply reflect on each of our own lives.After our self-reflection time was past, we were invited to divide into groups of 4 or 5 people to participate in a “Conversation Café.” I sat with 4 people I had not met or spoken to before. In our groups, we were asked to share our thoughts on our reflections with those in our group. I was hesitant to go first, thankfully someone else volunteered. As a college student, it is not a social norm to be overly open with others or to make yourself vulnerable to people you have just met. The discussion started off with each of our remarks on what we felt about the reflection activity and other fairly general conversation. However, once one person opened up about their struggles, each person after fell in line like a row of dominos. Before I knew it, I was having a heartfelt conversation with people I did not know 15 minutes prior to this activity.I am not someone who shares intimate information with people very easily; I struggle to even have these types of conversations with my friends and family. Yet, along with my group, I found solace in perfect strangers in speaking about very personal details of my life. It was an eye-opening experience, to say the least. I would say I am someone who could be classified as skeptical or even cynical, but I felt a personal connection with others that I was not expecting to feel. Through these conversations, I found that everybody is not that different whenever you get to really know each person. I left the class with a strange, powerful feeling after all of these unexpected, moving conversations and activities. There is only one word I can use to describe why I felt so moved: it was magic.The USI MAGIC course is a two-day immersion experience introducing participants to participatory design tools and principles for building age friendly communities. The course is open to the public will be offered November 8th and 9th, 2019. For more information and to sign up go here!Related PostsTweetShare12ShareEmail12 Shareslast_img read more

Innovative concept for implementing WHO resolution to safeguard quality of cancer treatment

first_imgJun 14 2018Cancer is a burden to those affected by it and a growing challenge to the political sector. In 2017, WHO therefore issued an international resolution to safeguard the quality of cancer treatment, and access to it, in every country in the world. The European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) has now put forward an innovative concept for implementing this resolution. Experts are calling for more investment in cancer prevention, early detection and infrastructure, guaranteed access to adequate cancer treatment and the creation and expansion of international networks in the areas of oncologic professionals and joint research. The Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) of MedUni Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, represented by its Head, Christoph Zielinski, and by Gerald Prager, Head of the Colorectal Cancer Unit (CCC-CRC) and the precision medicine platform (Platform for Molecular Diagnostics and Treatment in Oncology) of the CCC, are taking a leading role in the development of this expert paper. The paper was recently published in ESMO Open.Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsGlobally, around 8.8 million people a year die from cancer. This means that every year cancer claims more victims than HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Experts estimate that the number of cancer cases will double by 2035.In order to drive forward implementation of the WHO resolution, the ESMO, as the only international organization currently in this area of healthcare, has now put forward an implementation concept. This makes provision for a series of concrete measures and recommendations to national health authorities.Four main themesThe concept addresses four main themes:1)    The financial aspects of cancer diagnosis and treatment: for example, the authors recommend that countries invest in cancer prevention and early detection.2)    Access to treatment from a geographic, financial and socio-cultural perspective. MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital’s CCC is already implementing some aspects of this point via its “Community Oncology” program. By providing telemedicine offerings and consultancy services, this allows patients to be cared for close to their homes.3)    The establishment and safeguarding of fundamental services, such as providing awareness programs, instruments for evaluating the therapeutic benefit of drugs and the introduction of cancer registers.4)    Guaranteeing the highest possible quality of treatment: this primarily concerns personnel management, advanced training measures and joint international research initiatives.Says Prager: “The Cancer Resolution provides a guideline for all countries, be they rich or poor, for what they can do, within the means available to them, to ensure that their populations receive the best possible care. This even applies to countries such as Austria. For example, people who live in geographically remote areas should not receive a lower standard of care than patients in urban centers.”Source: https://www.meduniwien.ac.at/web/en/about-us/news/detailsite/2018/news-im-juni-2018/the-fight-against-cancer-more-investment-local-care-and-worldwide-structural-measures-needed/last_img read more

Adhering to antiinflammatory diet may reduce risk of early death

first_img Source:https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/anti-inflammatory-diet-linked-reduced-risk-early-death Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 14 2018Adhering to an anti-inflammatory diet was associated with lower risks of dying from any cause, dying from cardiovascular causes, and dying from cancer in a recent Journal of Internal Medicine study.In the study of 68,273 Swedish men and women aged 45 to 83 years who were followed for 16 years, participants who most closely followed an anti-inflammatory diet had an 18% lower risk of all-cause mortality, a 20% lower risk of cardiovascular mortality, and a 13% lower risk of cancer mortality, when compared with those who followed the diet to a lesser degree. Smokers who followed the diet experienced even greater benefits when compared with smokers who did not follow the diet.Anti-inflammatory foods consist of fruits and vegetables, tea, coffee, whole grain bread, breakfast cereal, low-fat cheese, olive oil and canola oil, nuts, chocolate, and moderate amounts of red wine and beer. Pro-inflammatory foods include unprocessed and processed red meat, organ meats, chips, and soft-drink beverages.”Our dose-response analysis showed that even partial adherence to the anti-inflammatory diet may provide a health benefit,” said lead author Dr. Joanna Kaluza, an associate professor at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences, in Poland.last_img read more

Chicks see numbers like we do

first_imgHumans and fuzzy newborn chicks have something in common—we tend to imagine numbers increasing from left to right. Although chicks can’t count in the same sense that humans can, they can distinguish between smaller and larger numbers of objects. Now, scientists have shown that chicks favor smaller numbers on the left and larger numbers on the right by noting how they choose between two cards with squares printed on them. Scientists trained the chicks by familiarizing them with a card with five squares and tempting them with a delicious mealworm hidden behind it. Later, when presented with a pair of identical cards, each with two squares—a smaller number than they had been trained with—the chicks usually searched for food behind the one on the left. When the test was repeated with two cards showing eight squares, they favored the card on the right, the team reports online today in Science. The similarity between chicks and humans suggests that humans’ “mental number line” is likewise innate, yet there is still a cultural component, as the left-right tendency can vary based upon language. Arabic speakers, who write from right to left, may have the opposite orientation, for example. The researchers suggest that the preferred direction of the number line could originate in brain asymmetries that are common to birds and humans. So your mental number map may be the result of being a birdbrain.last_img read more

Top stories Peering into black holes DNA for data storage and WHOs

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Lindzi WesselMar. 3, 2017 , 5:00 PM This global telescope may finally see the event horizon of our galaxy’s giant black holeLast year researchers “heard” black holes for the first time, when they detected the gravitational waves unleashed as two of them crashed together and merged. Now, they want to see a black hole, or at least its silhouette. Next month, astronomers will harness radio telescopes across the globe to create the equivalent of a single Earth-spanning dish—an instrument powerful enough, they hope, to image black holes backlit by the incandescent gas swirling around them. Their targets are the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy, known as Sagittarius A*, and an even bigger one in the neighboring galaxy M87. Top stories: Peering into black holes, DNA for data storage, and WHO’s dirty dozen Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Meet WHO’s dirty dozen: The 12 bacteria for which new drugs are most urgently neededYou may never have heard of Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or the Enterobacteriaceae—but these three killers top a new list, drawn up by the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland, of bacteria for which new drugs are desperately needed. Unveiled this week, the list contains 12 bacteria and bacterial families, with the top three making up the category “critical.” The crucial drugs are unlikely to be big moneymakers for companies that develop them, so governments and health agencies need to cooperate to boost the chances that they will be developed in time, notes Marie-Paule Kieny, WHO’s assistant director-general for health systems and innovation.Biologists propose to sequence the DNA of all life on EarthWhen it comes to genome sequencing, visionaries like to throw around big numbers: There’s the UK Biobank, for example, which promises to decipher the genomes of 500,000 individuals, or Iceland’s effort to study the genomes of its entire human population. Last month, at a Washington, D.C., meeting organized by the Smithsonian Initiative on Biodiversity Genomics and the Shenzhen, China–based sequencing powerhouse BGI, a small group of researchers upped the ante even more, announcing their intent to, eventually, sequence “all life on Earth.”Is a new class of painkillers on the horizon?Scientists are chasing a new lead on a class of drugs that may one day fight both pain and opioid addiction. It’s still early days, but researchers report that they’ve discovered a new small molecule that binds selectively to a long-targeted enzyme, halting its role in pain and addiction while not interfering with enzymes critical to healthy cell function. The newly discovered compound isn’t likely to become a medicine any time soon. But it could jumpstart the search for other binders that could do the job.DNA could store all of the world’s data in one roomHumanity has a data storage problem: More data were created in the past 2 years than in all of preceding history. And that torrent of information may soon outstrip the ability of hard drives to capture it. Now, researchers report that they’ve come up with a new way to encode digital data in DNA to create the highest-density large-scale data storage scheme ever invented. Capable of storing 215 petabytes (215 million gigabytes) in a single gram of DNA, the system could, in principle, store every bit of datum ever recorded by humans in a container about the size and weight of a couple of pickup trucks. But whether the technology takes off may depend on its cost. Email (Left to right): Hotaka Shiokawa/CfA/Harvard; Scott Noble/University of Tulsa; TIM LAMAN/National Geographic Creative; CDC last_img read more

As scientists prepare to march Science for the People reboots

first_img As scientists prepare to march, Science for the People reboots Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Science for the People Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The upcoming March for Science is frequently described as the first time U.S. scientists will take to the streets.Epidemiologist Frank Bove and biochemist Ben Allen know better. They are part of a small cadre of “science workers” trying to revive a short-lived organization—named Science for the People (SftP)—that evolved from the 1960s antiwar and civil rights movements and engaged in demonstrations, sit-ins, civil disobedience, and other forms of direct action. But whereas the current marchers want to defend open inquiry and evidence-based policy in response to outside assaults on the profession, SftP was trying to rescue science from itself.The original group maintained that too many U.S. scientists had become willing tools of an oppressive government that was fighting an unjust war and serving corporate interests. In its early years, SftP disrupted the annual meetings of AAAS (which publishes ScienceInsider), with activists shouting down speakers, accusing prominent scientists of serving the ruling class, and staging counter sessions on hot-button political issues.  Many scientists were turned off by those confrontational tactics, however, and the membership of SftP’s largest chapter in Boston never rose above a few thousand. By the early 1980s the organization, which drew its strength from half a dozen local chapters, had all but disappeared from view.Bove, 65, was a community organizer right out of college when he joined the Boston chapter in 1975 to work on its eponymously named magazine, which also served as the public face of the organization. He acknowledges that its radical critique of science wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea. “We were trying to make links to other issues, to broaden the politics to recognize that we were working under a capitalist system riven by the profit motive, sexism, racism, and militarism,” he says.Although Bove left the staff in 1977, he has never stopped enlisting science in battling those and other social ills. After earning a doctoral degree in public health and epidemiology, he joined the New Jersey Department of Health. For the past quarter-century he has worked for the federal government in Atlanta.In 2014 Bove received a prestigious “unsung hero” award from Boston University for his tireless efforts to help communities plagued by contaminated water and soil, notably the families of U.S. marines stationed at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. And he believes that the goal of SftP—to make science a force for good by having researchers address the needs of the average citizen—remains relevant today.“It’s not just about funding cuts or restrictions on immigration,” Bove says about two issues that loom large in this year’s march. “Yes, those are important issues for scientists. But our job is to get them to see that those problems are connected to bigger societal issues, like climate change and public health and environmental justice.”“To me, the question remains: In our pursuit of science, are we serving the people, or just corporate and government interests?”Rebooting a movementLong involved in progressive labor and antiwar (in this case Iraq and Afghanistan) causes, Allen helps manage a genomics database for a federal facility in Knoxville, Tennessee. But he had never heard of SftP when he saw a notice for a conference on the history of the movement.The conference, held in April 2014 at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, was an eye-opener for him. “These scientists had helped run free health clinics set up by the Black Panthers,” he says about one of the group’s many activities that moved well beyond the traditional boundaries of scientific activism. “That blew me away.”The 27-year-old Allen was thrilled to meet some of the people who had played prominent roles in an organization that had folded before he was even born. But he wanted more. “It was great to hear their stories,” he recalls. “But I didn’t see any follow-up. So a group of us, both original members and newcomers like me, got together and asked ourselves, ‘What would it take to reboot this thing?’”Three years later, the answer is still gestating. Allen is part of a steering committee wrestling with how the new SftP can become a truly national organization without diminishing the authority of its small, grassroots chapters, now operating in 10 cities. The first step, he says, is to ensure all the groups traditionally underrepresented in science play a prominent leadership role. “We don’t have a clear path forward,” Allen admits, “but we think it’s crucial to acknowledge the uneven terrain that has existed for so long within science.”Organizers of this month’s science march have faced similar criticism of being not sufficiently representative of both the scientific community and the larger public that they want to attract. At the same time, the organizers haven’t had the luxury of time to plan their strategy. Within days of the massive women’s march that followed the inauguration of President Donald Trump on 20 January, the idea of doing something similar for science exploded on social media. Since then, fierce debates over messaging, participation, and other details about the march have taken place online, in real time.In contrast, political activism unfolded at a more leisurely pace in the 1970s. The SftP magazine offered readers a chance to engage in thoughtful discourse over ideology and tactics, Bove recalls, as well as serving as a megaphone for information about upcoming protests and other events.As quaint as that may sound to millennials, Bove feels that a magazine still serves a valuable role in a social movement. “We’re talking about how to replicate the magazine in this era,” he says. “We think that writing articles is still a good way to spread information and to network.”Allen agrees, saying that the new group hopes to begin with blog posts and eventually move to long-form electronic journalism that would appear in a magazine format two or three times a year. In a departure from the deliberately decentralized approach of the original group, the new SftP will also try to maintain a national presence. “We want to be able to articulate the principles of the organization,” says Allen, “as well as have something to offer when chapters come to us for guidance or when someone wants to start a chapter in their city.”Whatever structure it assumes, say Allen and Bove, the revitalized SftP won’t waste time on one issue that has plagued the science march, namely, how political its actions should be. “We believe science is political, and that the way to get scientists into politics starts with a thoughtful discussion of politics,” Allen says. “One big goal is to provide people with a way to see the intersection of politics and science as a basis for taking action.”Bove thinks that climate change may be an ideal vehicle for launching such discussions. “It affects people’s jobs, their homes, their lives, their health,” he explains. “It’s also a good way to build coalitions with other organizations.”The fact that SftP needs to be revitalized is not a black mark against its founders, says Kelly Moore, a sociologist at Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois, who has studied social movements in science. “If we consider organizational survival to be the sine qua non of social movement success, SftP was a failure,” Moore wrote in her 2008 book, Disrupting Science, which devotes a chapter to SftP. “But if we think of social movement organizations as means to generate more activity, rather than to sustain or reproduce themselves, then SftP’s legacy is in the networks and ideas that it produced.”Organizers of this month’s marches so far have shown little interest in connecting with that legacy, Allen says. Nonetheless, he and Bove wish them well. Allen is a key organizer of the planned science march in Knoxville, and Bove plans to join marchers in Atlanta.Whether the 22 April events lead to a larger, sustained social movement or not, the march provides a venue for the two men to spread the word about the new SftP. “I’m hopeful that something good will come out of this,” Bove says. “A network of progressive scientists would be very helpful.”center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Jeffrey MervisApr. 4, 2017 , 5:15 PM Email Covers from 1970s issues of the magazine published by Science for the People.last_img read more

Top stories Disappearing insects Descartess bulging brain and a priceless botanical breakdown

first_img Where have all the insects gone?Entomologists call it the windshield phenomenon: Car windshields used to be covered in the spring and summer months with the remains of insects. That’s not the case in many places today. Observations about splattered bugs don’t count as scientific, so now researchers are turning to more than 30 years of data collected by a dedicated group of mostly amateur entomologists across western Europe. And what they’ve found supports the anecdotes: dramatic drops—up to 80%—in insect populations across dozens of sites.Descartes’s brain had a bulging frontal cortex Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Scientists have long wondered whether the brains of geniuses could hold clues about their owners’ outsized intelligences. Modern scientists are trying to figure out what made René Descartes’s mind tick by creating a 3D image of his brain by scanning the impression it left on the inside of his skull. One part that stood out: an unusual bulge in the frontal cortex, in an area that previous studies have suggested may process the meaning of words.This mysterious human species lived alongside our ancestorsWhen paleoanthropologist Lee Berger was digging up the cave-enshrined remains of a mysterious new species of hominin named Homo naledi in 2013, two spelunkers pulled him aside. They had found what looked like an ancient thigh bone in a completely different cave. Now, the thigh bone, a skull, and other fossils—collected as an afterthought—are putting a startling date on H. naledi’s existence: 236,000 to 335,000 years ago. That would mean a creature similar to ancient human ancestors lived at the same time modern humans were emerging in Africa and Neandertals were evolving in Europe.Botanists fear research slowdown after priceless specimens destroyed at Australian borderThis week’s news that Australian customs officers incinerated irreplaceable plant specimens has shocked botanists around the world, and left many concerned about possible impacts on international research exchanges. Some have put a freeze on sending samples to Australia until they are assured that their packages won’t meet a similar fate, and others are discussing broader ways of assuring safe passage of priceless specimens.Smuggled dino eggs gave birth to ‘baby dragons’In the early 1990s, scientists discovered an unusual cache: a set of large, thick-shelled fossil eggs topped by a single dinosaur embryo, previously entombed in rocks smuggled out of the Henan province of China. After the fossils were recovered and ultimately returned, scientists carefully analyzed the embryo—nicknamed “Baby Louie”—and determined that the 90-million-year-old remains represent a new species of giant oviraptorosaur, which they’ve dubbed Beibeilong sinensis, meaning “baby dragon from China.” (Left to right): Zhao Chuang; PAUL VAN HOOF/MINDEN PICTURES; Wits University/John Hawks Top stories: Disappearing insects, Descartes’s bulging brain, and a priceless botanical breakdown Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Ryan CrossMay. 12, 2017 , 3:45 PMlast_img read more

QA Why a top mathematician has joined Emmanuel Macrons revolution

first_img French President Emmanuel Macron has promised his country a revolution—and after a comfortable victory in the parliamentary elections, he is well-positioned to deliver. Macron’s brand-new centrist and reformist party, La République En Marche!, won 308 of the 577 seats in the National Assembly yesterday. Almost half of his delegates are women; most have never been active in politics.What the upset will mean for French science is unclear. Macron has promised to raise the country’s research spending from 2.2% of gross domestic product to 3% and give universities more autonomy. He aims to make France a world leader in climate and environmental science and has promised €30 million to help attract foreign scientists using a website named “Make Our Planet Great Again.” Most French scientists were relieved that Macron defeated far-right candidate Marine Le Pen last month, but reforms in science and higher education are likely to meet resistance from leftist groups.Science talked to one of En Marche!’s new National Assembly members, mathematician and Fields medalist Cédric Villani, 43, who won 69% of the vote in a constituency south of Paris. Villani, who heads the Henri Poincaré Institute in the capital, has won a book prize from the American Mathematical Society in 2014 and joined the prestigious Pontifical Academy of Sciences last year. Frequent media appearances over the past decade—and his trademark silk ascot and spider brooch—have made him one of France’s best-known scientists. (He also gave a TED talk explaining what’s so sexy about math.) Emmanuel Macron (left) is “a president who believes science is part of global politics,” Cédric Villani (right) says. By Elisabeth PainJun. 19, 2017 , 4:45 PM Q&A: Why a top mathematician has joined Emmanuel Macron’s revolution Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Questions and answers have been edited for clarity and brevity.Q: Why did you run, and why with Macron?A: I never recognized myself in any national political movement. But Macron’s party is enthusiastically pro-European, which has become very rare among national parties in France. It also went very much against the old political tradition of systematically attacking opponents during the presidential election; instead it promoted benevolence, pragmatism, and progress. And the party welcomed nonpoliticians with professional expertise.Q: What do you hope to achieve in the National Assembly—in general, and for science?A: I hope to participate in making France feel confident again—in its government, in its own abilities, and in the future. As to science, that’s a complex ecosystem, and the issues in France are well known. The efficiency of the competitive research funding agencies is one issue. How to reward researchers with significant achievements is another. How to organize the governance of universities. University entrance selection. The ratio of public and private investment in R&D. Patenting scientific discoveries and bringing products to market. And so on. There isn’t one particular topic I want to be associated with; I intend to push for the improvement of the science system as a whole.Q: Do you have concrete measures in mind?A: There is no simple solution. I would advocate better scientific steering of the National Research Agency. I’m in favor of awarding some researchers a special status, based on international evaluations, that comes with a reduced teaching load. On university governance, I favor relaxing the laws and making them less complicated. And universities should do a better job of informing students on the career outcomes of the degrees they offer.But in doing this, my goal isn’t just to serve science. My goal is to serve society with scientific expertise as a tool. Currently, scientific knowledge within French political circles is close to zero. It’s important that some scientific expertise is present in the National Assembly. Cédric Villani, Henri Poincaré Institute Frederic Stevens/Getty Images I hope to participate in making France feel confident again—in its government, in its own abilities, and in the future. Q: Part of the scientific community has yet to be convinced that Macron is really interested in science.A: We will see. He sent a strong first signal by according science policy its own ministry, by nominating a very competent minister, Frédérique Vidal, and giving her a broad mandate. Her nomination was welcomed by everybody, including the most radical faction of the scientific community. Macron’s welcome to foreign climate scientists was important as well. He is a president who believes science is part of global politics. It is important that scientists step in and become part of the political process. Now, if there is enough money in the system, a good balance between basic and applied research, and good governance—in other words, if the system works—chances are that the scientific community will be happy.Q: Is this the end of your career in mathematics?A: My research essentially stopped when I became institute director in 2009 and started to get more involved with the media. Now, I will leave the directorship. Often in life when you want to gain a new experience, you need to put something aside. But the current political situation in France is so unique and extraordinary that it is more than worth it.last_img read more

Fragile polar weather satellite system could be bolstered by microwavesensing CubeSats

first_img By Eric HandNov. 18, 2017 , 8:00 AM On 7 September, the microwave sensor on the Sumi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite captured heavy rainfall rates within hurricanes Irma (left) and Jose (right).  Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Through the clouds On the $1.6 billion Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1), the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) peers beneath clouds to measure temperature and humidity data crucial for weather forecasts. The $3 million Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) aims to gather similar data in a smaller package. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Weather satellites come in two main flavors. Geostationary satellites are parked 36,000 kilometers out, where their orbital speed matches Earth’s spin, so that they can stare down at one region and watch weather unfold. Polar satellites orbit at altitudes of only hundreds of kilometers and build a global view by tracing swath after swath along lines of longitude, as Earth spins. With the launch of the JPSS-1, the National Weather Service will be ingesting data from nine major polar satellites that cover every spot on Earth several times a day.From their closer vantages, polar satellites can measure the faint infrared and microwave emissions from oxygen and water vapor molecules in the atmosphere, indicating temperature and humidity at different altitudes. The infrared detectors have much better vertical resolution. But microwaves have their own advantage: They pass through clouds. That’s especially valuable for looking into storms at sea, where no ground-based radars exist.The JPSS-1’s microwave instrument is a technological step up from those on older polar satellites. It will help scientists map polar sea ice and measure intense bands of rain within hurricanes. Its temperature and humidity data will also provide a stronger baseline for measuring climate change. “We’ll have another time record that we’ll have more confidence in that will tell us how temperature has changed,” Goldberg says. NASA (LEFT TO RIGHT) BALL AEROSPACE; MIT LINCOLN LABORATORY; A. CUADRA/SCIENCE The polar weather satellite system is safe, for now. After years of rising costs and delays, the $1.6 billion Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) rocketed into orbit on 18 November from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The launch will still fears that a failure of the JPSS-1’s aging predecessor would cripple the armada of polar satellites that provides 85% of the input data for weather forecast models. “This data is so important for forecasting that you can’t take those chances,” says Mitch Goldberg, program scientist for the JPSS at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Greenbelt, Maryland.Hitchhiking on board the same rocket that carried the 4-meter-tall JPSS into orbit was a strikingly smaller and cheaper probe that is a harbinger of a yet more resilient weather satellite system. The $3 million Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA)—classed as a CubeSat because its components are stuffed into a stack of three 10-centimeter cubes—carries a cloud-penetrating microwave sensor that rivals one on the much bigger and costlier JPSS-1. There is a “kind of David and Goliath thing,” says Kerri Cahoy, MiRaTA’s principal investigator and an engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. “There will be a lot of interesting opportunities for comparison.”Though MiRaTA will not come close to replacing the JPSS-1, which carries four other instruments besides a microwave sensor, Cahoy says it foreshadows a day when weather data come from constellations of small, cheap, and replaceable satellites rather than from big battleships like the JPSS-1. “If these missions are successful then people will say, ‘Hmm, this is a different way to do this,’” she says. “Maybe it’s supplemental for a while, and maybe they meet in the middle.” Fragile polar weather satellite system could be bolstered by microwave-sensing CubeSats Email That confidence did not come cheap. At one point, NOAA, NASA, and the Department of Defense each weighed in on designs for what would become the JPSS, tacking on requirements. “Everything in the kitchen sink was thrown into the solution,” says Dave Powner, an official at the U.S. Government Accountability Office in Denver who has led audits of the program since 2004. The total budget for the program—including the JPSS-1; its precursor, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP), launched in 2011; and the JPSS-2, a clone due for launch in 2021—ballooned to $11.3 billion. Poor interagency communication slowed development, Powner says. Despite delays, the JPSS-1 was set to slide into orbit this week while Suomi NPP is still working.MiRaTA is an attempt to show that the JPSS’s microwave measurements can be done with a smaller package. It’s the brainchild of Bill Blackwell, an engineer at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, who came up with the idea on a cocktail napkin about a decade ago during a lunch at MIT’s faculty club. He realized that a 10-centimeter microwave antenna—the maximum possible size on a CubeSat—would provide enough resolution to see into the eyes of hurricanes, and that the data could be transmitted to Earth with a low-bandwidth CubeSat radio. A colleague tweaked the design of a microwave receiver used for astronomy, and Blackwell bore down on miniaturizing the electronics needed to process the signals.There have been teething pains. An earlier version, launched in 2014, made it to orbit, but its communication radio antenna got jammed, dooming the mission. But the low cost of a CubeSat means that failure is a chance to learn and try again. Blackwell plans to launch two more CubeSats in the coming months. Unlike MiRaTA, which keeps its antenna fixed on the planet, these CubeSats will alternately point their antennas at Earth and space as the head of the satellite spins 30 times a minute. That will allow the sensor to be calibrated against the background cold of the cosmos—a closer match to how the JPSS-1’s microwave sensor scans Earth.The agencies that built the JPSS-1 are starting to take small satellites seriously. In 2016, NASA selected Blackwell to lead a $30 million mission that would fly six of his CubeSats in equatorial orbits as early as 2020. That would increase the revisit rate for observing quickly evolving tropical storms from several times a day with the polar constellation to once every 40 to 50 minutes, says Scott Braun, the project scientist for the mission at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. “You can get that high temporal resolution to know what’s happening in between the looks from the bigger satellites.”Eventually, small weather satellites could replace the behemoths altogether. NOAA is considering missions called Earth Observation Nanosatellites—bulked-up CubeSats that would observe in the microwave and infrared and would be designed to match the JPSS data as well as possible. Christian Kummerow, an atmospheric scientist at Colorado State University in Fort Collins and an expert in microwave sounding, says the field is at a “crossroads.” “We could see a future where we change the paradigm from large, core observatories to constellations of smaller ones,” he says. “NOAA is clearly looking at that with an open mind.”last_img read more

NIH pulls the plug on controversial alcohol trial

first_img Email NIH pulls the plug on controversial alcohol trial Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, today killed a controversial clinical study that was already on life support: the Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health (MACH) trial.A working group of NIH advisers assembled to review the study found that senior officials at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) actively and secretively courted the alcohol industry to fund the $100 million project, and saw to it that a favored principal investigator (PI) won the funding. NIH Director Francis Collins this morning called the conduct “way outside of the acceptable culture of our noble institution” and, following the working group’s recommendation, ordered the study shut down “as quickly as that can be done.”“Many of the [NIH staff] who have seen the working group report were frankly shocked to see that so many lines were crossed,” Collins said in describing the findings, which were released today. For instance, he said, it was clear that backers of the study had manipulated the research plan to ensure an outcome favorable to the sponsors, which included five companies—Anheuser-Busch InBev, Carlsberg Group, Diageo, Heineken, and Pernod Ricard—and had hidden their activities from other NIH staff, behavior he called “a flashing neon light.” By Meredith WadmanJun. 15, 2018 , 5:45 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The 10-year trial aimed to enroll 7800 participants, with the active arm consuming one serving of alcohol each day and the control group none, to measure whether moderate alcohol consumption prevents the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as has been suggested by earlier studies.But the working group enlisted the opinions of epidemiologists and concluded that the study proponents appeared “to intentionally bias the framing of the scientific premise in the direction of demonstrating a beneficial health effect of moderate alcohol consumption.” The epidemiologists said the study did not plan to enroll enough patients or allow enough follow-up time to assess whether moderate alcohol consumption also increases cancer risks. They concluded that “the trial could show benefits while missing the harms.”The huge study was to have been funded mostly by the alcohol industry through donations to the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), a nonprofit established by Congress that is meant to provide a firewall between donors and the studies they fund, preventing them from influencing trial designs to promote particular outcomes. The working group found that senior NIAAA officials kept FNIH officials in the dark about their courting of alcohol companies. It also concluded that the officials ensured an investigator who helped them woo the industry—Kenneth Mukamal of Harvard Medical School in Boston—would become the trial’s PI.Mukamal and three members of NIAAA leadership had “sustained interactions” from at least 2013, prior to and during development of the Funding Opportunity Announcements for both the planning and main grants to fund the MACH trial, said NIH Principal Deputy Director Lawrence Tabak, who led the working group. “These interactions appear to have provided the eventual PI with a competitive advantage not available to any other applicant and effectively this steered funding to this investigator.”Collins praised The New York Times for revealing the actions of the alcohol institute officials in an article published in March, when, Collins said, he realized “this was a matter that needed really serious consideration.” Last month, Collins suspended enrollment in the trial pending the findings of the working group. At the time the trial was suspended, 105 people were enrolled. “Those are 105 people to whom we owe all kinds of information,” Collins said today.Before killing the study, Collins invited the opinion of George Koob, the NIAAA director who took the reins of the institute in January 2014. At that point, senior NIAAA officials had begun courting the industry to fund the study, but they hadn’t solicited grant applications for executing the trial or engaged FNIH as a vehicle for industry contributions.A strained-looking Koob told Collins and his advisory panel today: “I understand and agree with the significant concerns about the MACH study and its ultimate credibility. There were design issues … [and] also significant process irregularities … that undermined the integrity of the research process. We do not see a truly competitive competition [for the award]. The trial is irrevocably damaged and I don’t think we can justify continuing the study.”NIH is now undertaking a 60-day study to try to locate any other agency-funded projects that may have been compromised by donor influence or improper inside tracks for favored investigators. (In the case of the MACH trial, Mukamal was the only applicant for awards NIH solicited for both planning and execution phases of the study.)“We will see what we get from the new investigation and come up with an appropriate plan for interventions,” Collins said. “My expectation is that the MACH study is an unusual outlier, but I want to be sure I’m right. And this is the only way to find out.”For some, NIH’s internal investigation does not go far enough. “The shocking allegations” about the “aggressive campaign” by NIH officials to solicit industry funding require an independent investigation, says Michael Carome, director of the health research group at Public Citizen, a watchdog organization in Washington, D.C. In April, Public Citizen and 13 other groups asked Alex Azar, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), NIH’s parent department, to request an investigation by the HHS inspector general.*Correction, 18 June, 9:45 a.m.: An earlier version of this story stated that NIAAA officials had not solicited grant applications related to the MACH study before Koob, the current NIAAA director, took the helm in January 2014. In fact, NIAAA solicited applications for planning grants, to allow investigators to begin laying the groundwork for the trial, in July 2013, months before Koob arrived at NIAAA. iStock.com/JaysonPhotography Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Trump White House tried to bury US climate report That has only

first_img Climate scientists have appeared on national and international television shows for days, newspapers continue to pump out headlines, and the president himself is being questioned about it. Administration officials have said the report is fraudulent or exaggerated, which produces another wave of fact-checking.Some Republicans have reacted by showing support for the report, including Senator Thom Tillis (R–NC). That shows some members of the party are embarrassed by the week of denials, said Bob Inglis, a former Republican congressman who is now executive director of republicEn, which works to get conservatives to act on climate policy.”Trump is clearly becoming the climate disputer in chief and looking like a pretty silly caricature, where he is standing on his superstition about climate when the scientists are telling us about the data,” Inglis said. “I think the adults in the room, like Sen. Tillis, are doing what you would expect a responsible lawmaker to do, which is pay attention to the scientists who are presenting data and to turn away from some sort of superstitious disbelief of climate science.”Before the report was released, some critics of the administration were concerned that the White House would try to alter its findings. Instead, the administration allowed the report to be released and then questioned its credibility.On Tuesday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the report was “not based on facts.” Trump has said he did not believe the scientific assessment. Then he elaborated on his views.”One of the problems that a lot of people like myself — we have very high levels of intelligence, but we’re not necessarily such believers,” he told The Washington Post in an Oval Office interview. “You look at our air and our water, and it’s right now at a record clean.”Trump then repeated a claim that is popular among those who deny climate science: that scientists used to warn about global cooling in the 1970s. Early in his presidency, Trump was shown a fake Time magazine cover that features a supposed article about global cooling. In reality, scientists have known since the 19th century that adding carbon dioxide into the atmosphere will raise the Earth’s temperatures.”If you go back and if you look at articles, they talked about global freezing, they talked about at some point the planets could have freeze to death, then it’s going to die of heat exhaustion,” Trump said.Administration officials have said that the report is based on “extreme scenarios” and faulty assumptions and that it was not transparent. Trump’s allies have said that climate scientists are getting rich off the report. Both of those points have been refuted.The report includes lower- and higher-emissions scenarios, not just extreme projections, scientists have pointed out. Researchers did not receive compensation for writing the report.Yesterday, Andrew Wheeler, the acting administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), said the report was “interesting.” He then questioned the climate models that led to its assumptions.”We need to take a look at the modeling that is used for the next assessment,” he said at an event hosted by The Washington Post.The administration’s response has kept climate scientists busy. Katharine Hayhoe, an atmospheric scientist at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, and one of the report’s leading authors, said she has spent every day since its release fielding media questions. She attributes the attention to the White House’s response as well as to the specificity of the latest volume, which shows regional effects of climate change, she said.The more the administration talks about the report, or tries to downplay it, the more news it gets, she said. That, in turn, has more people paying attention to its findings.”For the majority of people who are listening, this coverage is positive, because it reinforces the messages again and again that yes, the science is certain,” Hayhoe said. “It reinforces the message that scientists agree, and also it directly attacks what I see as the most dangerous message, which is that it doesn’t matter to me.”The idea that the administration tried to hide the report appears to be fueling coverage, said Robert Kopp, a lead author on the first volume of the assessment and director of the Rutgers University Institute of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences in New Jersey. The assessment, he said, is inherently difficult to report on because it’s so detailed and the overarching messages are all things that have received coverage in the past.”Probably ‘The Trump administration tried to bury the report’ is a more attractive headline for journalists than ‘Trump administration releases report confirming the same thing reports have been confirming for decades,'” said Kopp.One reason the administration is struggling with its response to the report is because it lacks climate science experts, said Marlo Lewis, a senior fellow at the conservative Competitive Enterprise Institute, which has attacked established climate science. He said any response to the report will bring a new wave of critical coverage. Instead, he said, the White House should promote energy generation.”What would help in the long run is an in-house capability to make the moral, economic, and scientific case for free-market energy,” Lewis wrote in an email. “That could help Trump immensely with his base, party, and the general public, especially if the economy remains strong over the next two years.”The administration didn’t have an adequate response to the report because “they were surprised by it,” said Steve Koonin, a physicist at New York University in New York City who worked with former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt to formulate a climate science debate. Koonin criticized some of the report’s economic conclusions in a Wall Street Journal opinion piece this week, saying that they were overblown. Yesterday, he said one reason the administration was caught off guard is because it hasn’t adequately staffed the Office of Science and Technology Policy.”They just have to pay much more attention to what these reports say and ask the hard questions of people writing the reports,” said Koonin, “the kind of questions that any serious executive would ask of people who are doing analysis for them. We know how to do this in the national security space; why don’t we do it here?”Reporter Hannah Northey contributed.Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2018. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) President Donald Trump Email Originally published by E&E NewsU.S. President Donald Trump administration’s rebuke of a 1700-page climate report produced by 13 federal agencies has fueled a week of media coverage that shows little sign of dying down.The National Climate Assessment was dropped on Black Friday, an obscure time that was widely perceived as an attempt to bury the report. Instead, it’s been given extra life. Read more… Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0) Trump White House tried to bury U.S. climate report. That has only generated more attention By Scott Waldman, E&E NewsNov. 29, 2018 , 9:07 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

The plan to bring Woolly Mammoths back to life

first_imgThe Siberian Times recently reported that a proposal is being announced for a project that would create a 4 million ruble paleo-scientific research center to be built in the Yakutia area of Siberia. Its purpose will be to study genetic material from prehistoric animals such as the woolly mammoth and woolly rhinoceros, cave lions, and currently-extinct breeds of horses.The ultimate goal would be to clone those animals. Plans have already been designed for laboratories sunk in the permafrost, to work with samples from several different species.Yakutian horses. Photo UnarovMV CC BY 3.0The proposal is being presented by North-Eastern Federal University in Yakutsk. NEFU is already closely involved in cloning research with the South Korean biotech foundation Sooam, with whom they would be partnering for the new research center.The proposal is expected to be announced at the 4th Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok September 11-13th.Yakutia is an excellent location for such a project, since approximately 80 percent of Pleistocene animals found with preserved soft tissue come from this region of Siberia. The preserved soft tissue is necessary for the extraction of usable DNA.Pleistocene of Northern Spain showing woolly mammoth, cave lions eating a reindeer, tarpans, and woolly rhinoceros.Russian scientists have been studying mammoth DNA for years, according to Russia Beyond, but it wasn’t until 2013 that Russian scientists were sent to South Korea to study cloning.The mammoth’s genome has already been mapped, and it can be compared to that of the Asian Elephant. Changes can then be made to the elephant chromosome, creating a live mammoth chromosome.Mural depicting a herd walking near the Somme River in France, by Charles R. Knight, 1916. American Museum of Natural History.The Russian-South Korean partnership is not the only group coming close to restoring the mammoth from extinction. The Guardian talked about a group of Harvard-based researchers in the U.S. who are moving in the same direction.This group’s goal is to use the gene-editing technology CRISPR to modify an Asian elephant with mammoth DNA. This would make a sort of hybrid – an elephant with mammoth characteristics such as small ears, a woolly coat, and blood adapted to cold conditions. This team says they anticipate success within just a year or two.Lyuba the mummified baby mammoth. Photo by Ruth Hartnup CC BY 2.0The Guardian article brings up what should be another very important point in the discussion. Even if resurrecting the mammoth can be done… SHOULD it? For one thing, any attempt to clone a mammoth will probably require a live elephant to act as a surrogate.Asian elephants are on the verge of extinction now and don’t do well in captivity. It would take not just one elephant; it would probably take a number of them to successfully breed a mammoth baby.Indian elephant bull in musth in Bandipur National Park. Photo by Yathin S Krishnappa CC BY-SA 3.0Does the potential benefit for humanity outweigh the potential suffering for the surrogates? Why choose a mammoth instead of some other animal that is better suited to a life in captivity or one which doesn’t require a surrogate mother, at all?There have been some discussions of whether reintroducing mammoths to the steppe environment could help slow down climate change. Smithsonian reported that doing so could help prevent releasing more greenhouse gases from the melting permafrost in the tundra.Head of the “Yukagir Mammoth”; the trunk is not preserved. Photo by synchroswimr CC BY 2.0The permafrost in the Arctic tundra has been frozen since the Ice Age, and it holds huge amounts of carbon from dead plant life that’s contained in the ice. The volume of that carbon is estimated to be twice that of what’s in our atmosphere now. As the ice melts, it’s released as carbon dioxide and methane. This, in turn, speeds up global warming.Mammoths and other large herbivores from the Pleistocene Era helped create a steppe landscape by trampling down shrubs and mosses and rooting up trees, leaving lots of grasses and herbs, but no trees.Woolly mammoth model at the Royal BC Museum, Victoria, British Columbia. Photo Tracy O CC BY-SA 2.0The theory is that bringing these animals back would again spread the steppe environment more widely, cause the ground to absorb less heat, and delay the release of greenhouse gases — which would be great news for the world as a whole.The drawback to this plan is that we really have no way to know what the impacts on the environment could be when we take such a step. We don’t know if the ecosystem’s changes were caused by losing animals like mammoths or if we lost the animals because of the changes to their ecosystem. It’s a gamble on what the end results would be.Finally, it would take a lot of mammoths to really make a difference and a lot of time to breed them. Given the pace of climate change, it might take too long to make a real difference.Read another story from us: Christian Charity Received Mammoth Bones in a Donation BoxClearly, the idea of bringing back the mammoth is one that catches the imagination. The idea of having the ability to do so is pretty awe-inspiring as well. It’s an exciting idea to be able to look at something walking around that hasn’t done so in thousands of years. But it’s also a lot like playing God, and before taking such radical steps, we need to be very sure that we’ve given enough thought to the possible outcomes.last_img read more

Police chief addresses concerns Pertaining to no parking zone

first_img By Linda Kor         During the May 28 meeting of the Holbrook City Council meeting, Police Chief Nathan Christensen addressed the council regarding multiple complaints he has from the public regarding the newly established noSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Police chief addresses concerns Pertaining to no parking zone June 6, 2019last_img

Thousands pay tribute to Dalit Panthers cofounder Raja Dhale

first_imgBy Express News Service |Mumbai | Updated: July 18, 2019 1:40:06 am Related News Raja Dhale (1940-2019): ‘A real fighter… there can’t be another Ambedkarite like him’ Raja Dhale’s words and work stirred sleeping souls, gave expression to simmering Dalit anger Post Comment(s)center_img Thousands pay tribute to Dalit Panther’s co-founder Raja Dhale At the funeral of Dalit Panther’s co-founder Raja Dhale at Shivaji Park, on Wednesday. (Express Photo by Prashant Nadkar)THOUSANDS PAID tribute to writer and activist Raja Dhale at Vikhroli, Ghatkopar and Chaityabhoomi before he was cremated at Dadar on Wednesday evening. Co-founder of Dalit Panthers Movement in 1972, Dhale died at 78, following a cardiac arrest at his Vikhroli residence in Mumbai on Tuesday. On Wednesday evening, his final journey began from Tagore Nagar in Vikhroli – one of the main branches of the Dalit Panthers Movement.His mortal remains were taken to Kannamwar Nagar, also in Vikhroli, where Dhale had spent many years as a youth. The procession also passed through Ramabai Ambedkar Nagar in Ghatkopar.“Thousands gathered at the memorial he (Dhale) had built for Gopalbaba Walangkar, who influenced by Mahatma Phule, had worked against caste discrimination in Raigad district. Rajabhau had also established a library, having contributed many books himself to it, at Ramabai Ambedkar Nagar. Many spoke about the difference Dhale made to their lives,” Gautam Sangale, an associate of Dhale, said.Earlier, Prakash Ambedkar, RPI leader Ramdas Athavale and state minister Avinash Mahatekar visited the Dhale family and paid tributes to the activist. Former MP Kirit Somaiya and Shiv Sena MLA from Vikhroli, Sunil Raut also paid respect to Dhale. Advertisinglast_img read more